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dc.contributor.authorAbu Rahma, Ali
dc.contributor.authorKhadijah Abu-Rahma
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-28T09:08:00Z
dc.date.available2018-03-28T09:08:00Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.issnISSN: 2201-6333 (Print)
dc.identifier.issnISSN: 2201-6740 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.adu.ac.ae/handle/1/893
dc.descriptionIn Islam, man and woman are equally accountable to their creator. Therefore, each and every action is weighed against “accountability in the next life and the [reward and/or] punishment of Allah [God]” (Er, 2008: 34). The code of conduct in Islam stresses the importance of the relationship of man to his creator. In this way, an Islamic code of conduct is enforceable at all times since God is always watching the conduct of all people, with eternal knowledge and is, notably, closer to man than his jugular vein (Beekun, 1996). As a growing religion, Islam dictates the individual and collective behavior of all Muslims, who are the majority in more than 50 countries and account for more than one-fifth of the world’s population (Almoharby, 2011; Abuznaid, 2009; Sawar, 1989; Uddin, 2003). Islam, the second largest and the fastest growing religion in the world, (Armstrong, 2000; Khaliq and Ogunsola, 2011; Suter, 1997) provides individuals, and organizations, with directions to guide personal, moral, social, economic, educational, legal, and environmental directives (Ahmad, 2003).en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is a growing dichotomy between Islamic ideology and the application of Islamic values. If this trend continues, the notion that Islam, as a religion, is not a reliable source of knowledge or a moral guide may become the norm, with religion destined to remain separate from the real world. Thus, the impact of Islam as a way of life could be jeopardized. The ensuing consequence may result with formal worship becoming isolated from everyday application, whereby worship becomes limited to rituals. The treatment of this chasm should address the cause: a lack of educating and preparing students to live an Islamically aligned life, which serves both God and their community. A significant contribution toward a solution is to structure an Islamic Educational Institution (IEI). This paper proposes a conceptual model for an ideal Islamic Educational Institution that is Shari’ah-Compliant. This model may provide a contribution toward bridging the gap between the ideology and application of Islamic values and knowledge, thereby cultivating principled Muslimsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectIslamen_US
dc.subjectIslamic educational institutionen_US
dc.subjectShari’ah complianceen_US
dc.subjectIslamic Bankingen_US
dc.titleAn Ideal Islamic Educational Institution: A Conceptual Modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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