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dc.contributor.authorAhmad, Waqar
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-09T11:46:21Z
dc.date.available2022-02-09T11:46:21Z
dc.date.issued1993-07
dc.identifier.citationAhmad, W. I. (1993). Religious Identity, Citizenship, and Welfare: The Case of Muslims in Britain. American Journal of Islam and Society, 10(2), 217-233.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.adu.ac.ae/handle/1/2567
dc.description.abstractIn addressing the situation of Muslim communities in Britain, it is apparent that one of the major frameworks for understanding their situation has been the notion of" Citizenship," for citizenship is a means of identifying critical aspects of the relationship between the individual and the state. Following Bottomore (1992), we may make a useful distinction between" formal" and" substantive" citizenship: the former being Simply defined as" membemhip in a nation state" and the latter as" an array of civil, political, and especially social rights, involving also some kind of participation in the business of government''(ibid.). There are a number of salient points that should be made in relation to examining the implications of this distinction. First, we may note that the legal definition of citizenship is always informed by the cultural and ethnic agendas historically rooted in the foundation myths of each nationstate. Thus in France, for example, just as the revolutionary iconography of the Tricolor, Marianne, and Liberty, Equality, and Fratemity continue to serve contemporary national sentiments (Hobbawm 1983), so today French legal framing of formal citizenship is infused with its revolutionary roots:en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMuslim communitiesen_US
dc.subjectBritainen_US
dc.subjectLibertyen_US
dc.subjectEqualityen_US
dc.titleReligious Identity, Citizenship, and Welfare: The Case of Muslims in Britainen_US
dc.title.alternativeAmerican Journal of Islam and Societyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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